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Image: A. Amyloid-beta plaques in Alzheimers B. Neurofibrillary tangles (tau) in Alzheimer’s C. Lewy bodies (alpha-synuclein) in Parkinson’s D. TDP-43 inclusions in motor neurons in ALS

Prion-like proteins drive several diseases of aging

Two leading neurology researchers have proposed a theory that could unify scientists’ thinking about several neurodegenerative diseases and suggest therapeutic strategies to combat them.

The theory and backing for it are described in the September 5, 2013 issue of .

Mathias Jucker and Lary Walker outline the emerging concept that many of the brain diseases associated with aging, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, are caused by specific proteins that misfold and aggregate into harmful seeds. These seeds behave very much like the pathogenic agents known as prions, which cause mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease in deer, scrapie in sheep, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans.

Walker is research professor at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University. Jucker is head of the Department of Cellular Neurology at the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research at the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases.

Unlike prion diseases, which can be infectious, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and other neurodegenerative diseases can not be passed from person to person under normal circumstances. Once all of these diseases take hold in the brain, however, it is increasingly apparent that the clumps of misfolded proteins spread throughout the nervous system and disrupt its function.

The authors were the first to that a protein that is involved in Alzheimer’s disease – known as amyloid-beta – forms prion-like seeds that stimulate the aggregation of other amyloid-beta molecules in senile plaques and in brain blood vessels. Since then, a growing number of laboratories worldwide have discovered that proteins linked to other neurodegenerative disorders also share key features with prions.

Age-related neurodegenerative disorders remain stubbornly resistant to the discovery of effective treatments. Jucker and Walker propose that the concept of pathogenic protein seeding not only could focus research strategies for these seemingly unrelated diseases, but it also suggests that therapeutic approaches designed to thwart prion-like seeds early in the disease process could eventually delay or even prevent the diseases.

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Tuesday, July 10, 2018
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Nearly 500 Wilmington properties added to new FEMA flood zone map

According to FEMA, the floodplain is changing. Regulatory areas for flooding, including Greenfield Lake, RiverLights, and the downtown area, are widening. Meanwhile, high-velocity zoning, areas at risk from the direct impact of waves along the Intracoastal Waterway near Landfall and Summer Rest Road are dialing back.

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WILMINGTON—Soon, nearly 500 properties in Wilmington will be designated within FEMA’s Special Flood Hazard Area, which will cause insurance adjustments for residents by late August.

Nearly 800 parcels, including453 residential and 14 commercial structures, will likely see increased insurance under FEMA’s new flood zones. Kathryn Thurston, Wilmington’s floodplain manager, made note of FEMA’s zoning trends in a case summary report that will be reviewed by the city’s Planning Commission on July 11.

Drivers and pedestrians in Wilmington may have noticed the flood map signs posted along well-traveled roadways. However, the signs’ locations do not necessarily indicate parcels up forflood rezoning. They are simply intended to garner public attention.

“They were posted in primary thoroughfares for the general public,” Thurston said.

In her report, Thurston pointed out several patterns among hundreds of flood rezonings recommended by FEMA. While properties located along the Intracoastal Waterway near Landfall and Summer Rest Road are designated as having decreased flood risk, properties within Bradley Creek and Hewletts Creek communities are receiving higher-risk zonings.

RiverLights, downtown Wilmington and the Greenfield Lake community will remain in the same flood zone for the most part. However, Thurston found the regulatory floodplain to be widening along those areas.

In New Hanover County – not including Wilmington’s city limits –approximately 698 structures will soon be added to FEMA’s “AE Zone.” This zone is referred to as the 100-year floodplain, slightly less risky than the “VE Zone,” which is designated for high-velocity area subject to wave action.

With approximately 300 fewer county properties designated in the VE Zone under FEMA’s new maps, the city is also experiencing a shift away from high-velocity zoning according to Thurston’s report. In other words, more properties are at risk from flooding, while fewer are at risk from the direct impact of ocean waves.

Wilmington’s Planning Commission and City Council will vote to approve floodplain rezonings in addition to flood amendments to maintain federal compliance before FEMA’s August 28 deadline.

If the city chooses not to update its maps and code according to FEMA’s recommendations, residents will no longer be eligible to receiveinsurance subsidies through the National Flood Insurance Program.

To look up your property according to FEMA’s new floodplain designations, visit FRIS’s interactive online map .On the righthand side of the map, click on “effective” and select “preliminary.” The “preliminary” results represent FEMA’s new floodplain designations.

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Meet the students studying abroad at SCET from the Netherlands

May 9, 2018

Startup Semester Spotlight: Marcelo Dias

April 30, 2018

Startup Semester: UNIST Spotlight

November 6, 2017

Curriculum

Students will take a full-time course load throughout the semester. Transferable credit can be offered through the hosting university or UC Berkeley Extension under Concurrent Enrollment. The semester will consist of a nine-unit Entrepreneurial Core consisting of the esteemed Newton Lecture Series or the Silicon Valley Introduction to Finance for Entrepreneurs (when available) anda Challenge Lab of the student’s choice. Electives are specifically chosen to supplement the core curriculum with IEOR / SCET courses and/or University courses. These are intended to provide students with lifelong learning to enhance the basics taught through the Core courses.

As part of the Entrepreneurial Core, studentswill partake in the Newton Lecture series and meetesteemed global and local distinguished innovators to learn from their successes and failures. Read more.

In a competition-based format, students work in cross-discipline lean start-up teams vying to create innovative products. Teams will navigate realistic weekly challenges introduced through case studies. Read more .

The bootcamp facilitates immersive learning for new venture creation. This workshop offers a one-of-a-kind experience in one of the premier institutions in Silicon Valley. Read more .

Courses

Core Requirements

(INDENG 190-001 - 2 units)

This orientation class is exclusive to Startup Semester Students. It will provide an overview of Silicon Valley business business culture and a survey of topics uniquely related to the creation of new technology ventures. The format will include lectures, workshops and interaction with the Berkeley startup ecosystem.

(INDENG 95/195/295 - 1 unit)

This lecture series recognizes the entrepreneurial vision of A. Richard Newton, Dean of UC Berkeley’s College of Engineering from 2000 to 2007, by inviting distinguished innovators to share lessons from their own successes and failures.

(INDENG 190b - 4 units)

In a competition-based format, students work in cross-discipline lean start-up teams vying to create innovative products. Teams will navigate realistic weekly challenges introduced through case studies. They will understand real-world constraints, use rapid iterative build, and validate development methods. Through frequent interaction with the sponsors and mentors, student teams will develop a working prototype and a "white paper."

*Note: For Fall 2018, SCET offers three Challenge Lab topics: Blockchain, Algorithms, and Sports Technology. Students are required to choose one to fulfill their requirement.

(3 units, one course)
Applied Data Science with Venture Applications
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